Bergere de France review



Bergere de France offer some stunning Parisienne designs to take your knitting to another level. Their winter magazine has a wonderful modern take on a Fair Isle design jumper and any of their previous magazines can be back ordered.

Bergere de France 2013/2014 collection

Bergere de France 2013/2014 collection

Patterns from Bergere de France can be purchased singly or as compilations in their seasonal magazines which offer great value for money.

There is something for everybody, from beginner to experienced knitter and all patterns denote the level of skill required.

Send for their catalogue and you receive comprehensive detail of their latest patterns along with small samples of the yarns attached to the relevant pages, which make a huge difference when trying to choose yarn type and colour.

The Bergere de France brochure also contains details of all the other items available via their website; knitting needles, needle sets, embroidery kits and haberdashery.

 

More Information Visit the Bergere de France website

What is a stitch?



Terminology used in knitting can be confusing for the beginner.

Thanks to the ambiguity of the English language, the word ‘stitch’ in knitting can mean two completely separate things.

Multicoloured knitting

Multicoloured stocking stitch

1 – Refers to a singular stitch on the needle and the method by which it is created.

An example of this would be a knit stitch or a purl stitch.

2 – Refers to a combination of stitches which create a pattern in the fabric being knitted.

Examples of this would be; stocking stitch, garter stitch, rib stitch or moss stitch, among many others.

All of these combinations of stitches form “textures” in the fabric and are made using the knit and purl stitch in various way.

The picture on the right shows a garment knitted in stocking stitch, which is formed by knitting the stitches on the right side of a row and purling the stitches on the wrong side.

Learning the basic stitches

When learning to knit, all you need to start with are the two basic Knit and Purl stitches.  Once you have mastered these, you will be able to create many combinations as required in knitting patterns.

Cast on a few stitches and knit a few rows completely out of knit stitches, then knit a number of rows of purl stitches.

You will then get some idea of how these stitches are formed and start to understand how many textures can be achieved by combining the two.

How to do a knit stitch



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The knit stitch is one of the two basic stitches which form the structure of all knitting patterns.

Used on it’s own to knit both sides of a row, it will form “Garter stitch”.

Following a pattern or chart, this stitch will be indicated as a “K” followed by the number of stitches to be knit.

One of the most popular stitches, “Stocking stitch” is obtained by knitting the right side row of stitches and purling the wrong side.

Combined alternately with the purl stitch it can be used to form ribbing or moss stitch, among many others.

 

Casting on – Single needle method



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Casting on, is the knitting term used to describe the method of creating the first row of stitches and there are a number of ways to do this.

How much yarn?

Before casting on using the single needle method, you are going to have to determine how much yarn will be needed for the first row of stitches.

As a general rule 1 cm = 1 stitch.  However, a knitting pattern may give you this instruction but it is wise to allow more than you think you need.

Use the 1 cm = 1 stitch rules and then add half an arms length.  It really does not matter if you have too much, because this can be used for stitching up with later.  However, if you have too little, it is heartbreaking to cast on a row of 100 stitches and find you are only 4 or 5 short…the only option is to pull off your stitches and start again!

Pull enough yarn with your left hand from the ball or hank.

First Stitch

Regardless of which casting on technique you wish to use, the first stitch is always a slip stitch.

Single needle method

Using either the thumb or first finger – this is a good cast on method for beginners to learn, as it gives a very elastic and less noticeable edge.

Referred to as the Double cast, Continental or Long tail cast on method, we have selected one of the easiest versions using the index finger of the left hand and needle in the right hand.

This stitch provides a good even, stretchy foundation row for any type of stitch and tends to be my cast on method of choice for most applications.

Because the stitches are literally knitted into place, it is easy to knit the next row from and once mastered, is one of the fastest cast on methods.

Casting on – First Stitch



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Casting on, is the knitting term used to describe the method of creating the first row of stitches.

How much yarn?

Before casting on, you are going to have to determine how much will be needed for the first row of stitches.

As a general rule 1 cm = 1 stitch.  However, a knitting pattern may give you this instruction but it is wise to allow more than you think you need.

Use the 1 cm = 1 stitch rules and then add half an arms length.  It really does not matter if you have too much, because this can be used for stitching up with later.  However, if you have too little, it is heartbreaking to cast on a row of 100 stitches and find you are only 4 or 5 short…the only option is to pull off your stitches and start again!

The Slip knot

Regardless of which cast on technique you want to use, the very first stitch is made by creating a slip knot.

There are many variations on a theme, but we think that this is one of the simplest and less fiddly forms to manage.

 

 

Knitting needle size conversion chart



Some handy printable knitting and size conversion charts.

Knitting Needle Sizes

Knitting needle size conversion chart

A handy reference guide

Knitting needles are often handed down through generations, which in the UK can lead to some confusing sizing between the old Imperial and more recent Metric measurements.

Add into the mix a completely opposite sizing practice used in the US and the unique measurements of Japanese knitting needles and you have a recipe for disaster before you even cast a stitch on.

Many old knitting patterns are still in wide circulation and with the ability to download patterns via the internet, it is important to be able to convert accurately and easily.

We have created one of the most comprehensive knitting needle size conversion charts which you can download in PDF format.

Knitting Abbreviations

Coming soon….